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Plankton Day

Feb 22, 2012

Location: Curacao
Author: Alex
On day 27 the Argonauts found themselves saying goodbye to Bonaire. We woke up at 7 and set to finishing up passage prep and facing the hard truth that we had to say goodbye to what was arguably one of the crew’s favorite islands so far. Our journey to Curacao, however, was an eventful one, making the separation a little easier. Once we got into the open ocean our Marine Biology class started. After learning about drag factor and its importance in marine organisms, clay and toothpicks covered the deck of the boat as each team tried to create the best structure for plankton. We timed how long it took for each of our creations to sink 30 ft. In the end most people managed to have plankton that took about 7.5 seconds to sink, but the Matt D. Joe and David teams ball of spikes was victorious, with a sinking time of over 10 seconds. After marine biology we hoisted the sails and set off for Curacao. We were happy to be able to sail again, after our three-day journey that was made entirely by motor. We headed down to the saloon for oceanography and mid-way through class heard the grumble of the engine, as apparently the air had died and, once again, we were motoring. We finished off our classes for the day with sailing class, which consisted of a pin rail race. One member from each team stood at the ready at the stern of the boat as one of the staff member called out a name of a piece of rigging or part of the boat, and the first person to touch that item won their team a point. The even team had a solid lead throughout the game, but the odds finished off with a strong performance, but it wasn’t quite enough to over take the speed walking fiends of team even. Soon, Argo landed in Curacao whose beauty may rival that of Bonaire’s. After a hearty dinner of chicken and biscuits the Argonauts are ready to muster in the saloon for a movie night, which most likely will only last twenty minutes before one by one people begin to disappear into their cabins to recharge for the next day, which will not doubt hold much excitement.