Virgin Islands to Grenada

Aboard S/Y Ocean Star

1,300 Nautical Miles via The Grenadines, Martinique, Antigua, Saba

Grasp lessons (and earn college credits) in oceanography, marine biology, basic seamanship and leadership–not to mention the wisdom that comes from working with shipmates from across the globe to complete your journey. Study marine biology up-close as you tag turtles at Mountain Point and complete reef check dives in Soufriere, St. Lucia. Climb to… and jump from the top of the Seven Sisters waterfall in Grenada. Dive off Great Dog Island to explore the array of marine life that call a submerged airplane home.

All told, you’ll explore the British Virgin Islands, the islands of Saba, St. Eustatia, The Grenadines, St. Lucia, Martinique, Dominica, Guadeloupe and The Saints, Montserrat, Antigua and St. Barts. If you want to see every facet of the Caribbean, earn sailing and diving certifications as well as a full semester of college credits–this is your adventure.

  • Days
  • Credits
  • Students
  • Term
  • Availability
  • Tuition (USD)
Fall / Sep 20 - Dec 8, 2017
  • 80
  • 12 credits
  • 16
  • Fall
  • Open
  • $24,370
Fall / Sep 20 - Dec 8, 2018
  • 80
  • 12 credits
  • 16
  • Fall
  • Open
  • TBA

Life Aboard

Sails Up Anchors Down

Academic Classes

Certification Courses

Activities

  • Scuba Diving & Snorkeling
  • Educational & Cultural Tours
  • Hiking & Trekking
  • Service
  • Personal Time

The Voyage

Your Adventure Starts Here
Welcome aboard!

The journey begins at our home base at Soper’s Hole in the west end of Tortola. It won’t be hard to find our 88-ft schooner, S/Y Ocean Star, tied alongside the dock with an eager crew of 4 staff waiting to greet you with a smile. After dropping your bags in your cabin, it’s time to take a breath, look around and realize that this beautiful schooner floating atop crystal clear Caribbean waters is now your home and classroom for the next 80 days as you embark on the voyage of a lifetime.

Learning the Ropes
8-10 days

Early on day two, we cast our lines and the journey begins. As with all Sea|mester voyages, the first week to ten days of the program is a crash course on how to be successful in your new environment. With the guidance of our staff, you’ll learn the in’s and out’s of how to live, work and learn in such close quarters with others – from sailing to cooking and everything in between.

Those new to scuba diving will spend quite a bit of time underwater working towards the PADI Open Water Certification. Those arriving with more experience will get reacquainted with the underwater world by taking a few refresher dives.

During the first week, you’ll also have your first lectures for each of the four college-level courses. While the structure of the syllabi might look familiar, you’ll quickly find that learning from the deck of a boat couldn’t be more different.

Sample Trip Itinerary*
Area Ports of Call
British Virgin Islands Tortola, Virgin Gorda, Peter Island, Salt Island, The Dogs, Sandy Spit, Jost Van Dyke
Leeward Islands Nevis, Antigua, St. Barts, Statia, Saba, St. Kitts
Windward Islands Bequia, St. Lucia, Martinique, Dominica, The Saints, Guadeloupe
Grenada & the Grenadines Grenada, Carriacou, Union Island, Tobago Cays
*Please note that all destinations are weather dependent and subject to change.

 

Play
Video
seamester-sailing-video
Rite of Passage
Sailing without seeing land

It’s going to seem like we’ve crammed about 2 months’ worth of information into that first 8-10 day period, but time will fly by as you absorb it all. Station drills, man overboard drills, fire drills… it’s now time for you and your team to put it all to the test with the first of many sailing passages, a 24-hr voyage from the BVI to the islands of St. Kitts and Nevis.

As we turn our bow to the southeast, the rhythm of the trip shifts. With the fundamental knowledge in place, we now embark on the next phase of the expedition, our days alternating between those spent ashore exploring and those on passage, voyaging between six hours and as many as three days to reach a new destination.

Anchors Down – Nevis
(2-4 days)

After making it through your first overnight passage from the BVI, you’ll make landfall at the birthplace of Alexander Hamilton.  Here on Nevis you’ll have the chance to explore the capital city Charlestown, hike through a volcanic rainforest to “The Source”, bike tour its hilly and quaint roads or simply enjoy a little personal time on the beach.

>Next stop: Grenada & the Grenadines
Grenada & The Grenadines
(10-12 days)

From Nevis you’ll embark on your longest passage yet, 3-4 days of beautiful downwind sailing to the island of Grenada. During your time in the Grenadines you’ll get the chance to hike to the top of, and jump off the epic Seven Sisters waterfalls in Grenada, tour the unique whaling culture of Bequia or dive the bluest water you’ve ever seen in the Tobago Cays.

> Next stop: St. Lucia
St. Lucia
(2-4 days)

Upon arrival you’ll set anchor in Soufriere in the shadow of the Petit Piton, one of the most beautiful spots in all of the Caribbean.  During our time in St. Lucia you’ll work with the local marine park SMMA to spearfish the invasive Lionfish, take a mineral bath at the Diamond Botanical Gardens and get a well-deserved night out in Marigot Bay.

> Next stop: Martinique
Martinique
(1-3 days)

On the first French Caribbean island you visit during your voyage, Martinique gives you ample opportunity to explore its gorgeous land and waters.  On land you’ll partake in one of the largest hikes of the trip, hiking straight up Mt. Pelee, the now dormant volcano that erupted in 1902 devastating the islands and its residents.  Under water in St. Pierre you’ll get to dive on the myriad of sunken ships the volcano also took with it.

> Next stop: Dominica
Dominica
(4-6 days)

Nicknamed the Nature Isle of the Caribbean, Dominica is often considered one of our students favorite islands of the voyage. With the help of our good friends, local Dominicans Pancho and Sea Cat, you’ll hike through the rainforest to the world’s largest boiling lake, all while refreshing yourself in one of its dozens of natural hot springs. You’ll also spend a day taking a tour of the island eating more deliciously fresh Caribbean fruit than your stomach should be able to handle.

Play
Video
Seamester Scuba Diving
Exploring the underwater world
20-25 Dives

Students often tell us they chose this voyage because of the amount of diving and dive training we offer. Whether a deep dive on a 100ft. sunken ship in Statia, or a night dive in Guadeloupe, during your 80 days you’ll likely dive 20-25 times.

If you’re new to diving, you’ll earn the PADI Open Water Dive Certification as well as the Advanced Open Water Dive Certification. Depending on time, conditions and student interest, many groups also earn the PADI Rescue Diver certification. If you’re already an experienced diver, you can work all the way up to the professional Divemaster certification. If you feel that scuba diving is a passion, this is definitely the voyage to consider.

Giving Back
20-30 Service Hours

Creating an opportunity to give back to the amazing communities that welcome us is a component of any Sea|mester voyage. While projects vary from voyage to voyage, in the past we’ve done anything from collecting data underwater for local marine parks to building new structures in schools. Our students have also done a little teaching themselves, working in schools to teach local students a little about marine biology and why protecting their environment is critical.

Regardless of the project, making time to give back is a great way to connect on a deeper level to the Caribbean community.

Anchors Down – Guadeloupe & Les Saintes
(4-6 days)

One of the reasons you’ll love the Caribbean is the cultural diversity between each individual island.  Due to colonization in the 1500’s, Guadeloupe & Les Saintes are to this day considered to be a region of France.  The minute you step off the boat you’ll realize that the islands are very much steeped in French culture.  The best examples are found in the Fort Napoleon (yes that Napoleon) in Les Saintes, and the underwater statue of Jacques Cousteau at Pigeon Island in Guadeloupe.

> Next stop: Antigua
Antigua
(5-7 days)

Directly after visiting two very french islands, you’ll arrive at the very British Nelsons Dockyard in Antigua.  This is one of the world’s only fully restored Victorian era dockyards, which provides an amazing backdrop to your time spent in Antigua.  While here, you’ll enjoy a steel drum and reggae concert at Shirley Heights, walk the historic ramparts of English Harbor and dive the crystal blue waters while anchored outside of Green Island.

> Next stop: St. Barths
St. Barths
(2-4 days)

Surf day!  Although you will certainly enjoy a cup of French espresso in Gustavia, the real adventure begins as we pack a couple of jeeps with surf boards and hit the waves for a day of surfing on St. Barths north shore.  Being another of the Lesser Antilles French islands, you’ll pause at lunchtime for a beach picnic of freshly baked baguette and stinky cheese before paddling back out to catch another wave.

> Next stop: Saba & Statia
Saba & Statia
(3-5 days)

These two Dutch islands provide you with yet another culturally diverse backdrop on your adventure through the Caribbean Lesser Antilles.  During your time in Statia you’ll dive the 100ft. shipwreck of the Charlie Brown and snorkel the ruins of Oranjestad’s sunken harbor in search of the elusive blue bead.  At Saba, you’ll test yourself by tackling the 2,855 ft. (1,064 stone steps) tall Mt. Scenery and spend the day learning how to blow glass while visiting the quaint town called The Bottom.

> Next stop: Back to the BVI
Play
Video
accredited-academics-seamester
Academics Aboard
12 USF Credits

Throughout the voyage, it’s easy to forget that this is college even though academics are an integral part of the experience. Our instructors schedule 3 or 4 lectures, discussions, or labs per class each week and each course includes quizzes, research projects, midterms, and finals.

Learning in an environment that combines academia with experience allows you to truly interact with your education. It brings academics to life, adding relevance and practical application to the material. Learning has never been this fun.

Time to Say Goodbye

The best way to explain what it means to say goodbye after such an incredible experience is to use the words from someone who had to do just that…

“It is hard to believe that 80 days have passed by since 15 pale faces climbed aboard Ocean Star for the first time. We have had an amazing adventure over these past 80 days, visiting 13 countries and sailing some 1,320 nautical miles through the Caribbean. We have explored volcanoes, mountains, waterfalls and beaches; learned about new cultures, languages, and food; scuba dived on reefs of all shapes and sizes; learned science, sailing, diving and even how to cook; pushed ourselves academically, physically and emotionally; and turned a boat of 19 strangers into a home and family. This was a great adventure, but don’t let it be your greatest adventure – keep exploring, learning and pushing yourself...”
S/Y Ocean Star Staff TeamBVI, 2015
Day 56
By Eric L.

Tide Pools and Dancing Fools

The Ocean Star crew rose this morning in historic Nelson’s Dockyard to the smell of fresh baked cinnamon rolls by …

Read More
Day 55
By Elizabeth P.

Rays, Rays, Rays!

Sunshine rays, UV rays and the most important rays of all: the southern sting rays! We spent the entire morning …

Read More
Day 52
By Michaela B.

Diving With Jacque Cousteau

Today was an early sleepy awakening on Ocean Star. We moved from the beautiful islands of Les Saintes, over to …

Read More
Day 46
By Abby R.

Kids and Prime Ministers

Today I met a 6-year-old named Malik. I also met a prime minister.   This extremely rainy day for the …

Read More
Day 43
By Marina K.

A Journey to The Center of The Earth

Today’s the day! Its finally time for the long awaited (and my personal favorite) Boiling Lake hike! Dominica is a …

Read More

Trip Logs

Welcome aboard!

The journey begins at our home base at Soper’s Hole in the west end of Tortola. It won’t be hard to find our 88-ft schooner, S/Y Ocean Star, tied alongside the dock with an eager crew of 4 staff waiting to greet you with a smile. After dropping your bags in your cabin, it’s time to take a breath, look around and realize that this beautiful schooner floating atop crystal clear Caribbean waters is now your home and classroom for the next 80 days as you embark on the voyage of a lifetime.

Sample Trip Itinerary*
Area Ports of Call
British Virgin Islands Tortola, Virgin Gorda, Peter Island, Salt Island, The Dogs, Sandy Spit, Jost Van Dyke
Leeward Islands Nevis, Antigua, St. Barts, Statia, Saba, St. Kitts
Windward Islands Bequia, St. Lucia, Martinique, Dominica, The Saints, Guadeloupe
Grenada & the Grenadines Grenada, Carriacou, Union Island, Tobago Cays
*Please note that all destinations are weather dependent and subject to change.

 

Learning the Ropes
8-10 days

Early on day two, we cast our lines and the journey begins. As with all Sea|mester voyages, the first week to ten days of the program is a crash course on how to be successful in your new environment. With the guidance of our staff, you’ll learn the in’s and out’s of how to live, work and learn in such close quarters with others – from sailing to cooking and everything in between.

Those new to scuba diving will spend quite a bit of time underwater working towards the PADI Open Water Certification. Those arriving with more experience will get reacquainted with the underwater world by taking a few refresher dives.

During the first week, you’ll also have your first lectures for each of the four college-level courses. While the structure of the syllabi might look familiar, you’ll quickly find that learning from the deck of a boat couldn’t be more different.

Play
Video
seamester-sailing-video
Rite of Passage
Sailing without seeing land

It’s going to seem like we’ve crammed about 2 months’ worth of information into that first 8-10 day period, but time will fly by as you absorb it all. Station drills, man overboard drills, fire drills… it’s now time for you and your team to put it all to the test with the first of many sailing passages, a 24-hr voyage from the BVI to the islands of St. Kitts and Nevis.

As we turn our bow to the southeast, the rhythm of the trip shifts. With the fundamental knowledge in place, we now embark on the next phase of the expedition, our days alternating between those spent ashore exploring and those on passage, voyaging between six hours and as many as three days to reach a new destination.

Anchors Down – Nevis
(2-4 days)

After making it through your first overnight passage from the BVI, you’ll make landfall at the birthplace of Alexander Hamilton.  Here on Nevis you’ll have the chance to explore the capital city Charlestown, hike through a volcanic rainforest to “The Source”, bike tour its hilly and quaint roads or simply enjoy a little personal time on the beach.

>Next stop: Grenada & the Grenadines
Grenada & The Grenadines
(10-12 days)

From Nevis you’ll embark on your longest passage yet, 3-4 days of beautiful downwind sailing to the island of Grenada. During your time in the Grenadines you’ll get the chance to hike to the top of, and jump off the epic Seven Sisters waterfalls in Grenada, tour the unique whaling culture of Bequia or dive the bluest water you’ve ever seen in the Tobago Cays.

> Next stop: St. Lucia
St. Lucia
(2-4 days)

Upon arrival you’ll set anchor in Soufriere in the shadow of the Petit Piton, one of the most beautiful spots in all of the Caribbean.  During our time in St. Lucia you’ll work with the local marine park SMMA to spearfish the invasive Lionfish, take a mineral bath at the Diamond Botanical Gardens and get a well-deserved night out in Marigot Bay.

> Next stop: Martinique
Martinique
(1-3 days)

On the first French Caribbean island you visit during your voyage, Martinique gives you ample opportunity to explore its gorgeous land and waters.  On land you’ll partake in one of the largest hikes of the trip, hiking straight up Mt. Pelee, the now dormant volcano that erupted in 1902 devastating the islands and its residents.  Under water in St. Pierre you’ll get to dive on the myriad of sunken ships the volcano also took with it.

> Next stop: Dominica
Dominica
(4-6 days)

Nicknamed the Nature Isle of the Caribbean, Dominica is often considered one of our students favorite islands of the voyage. With the help of our good friends, local Dominicans Pancho and Sea Cat, you’ll hike through the rainforest to the world’s largest boiling lake, all while refreshing yourself in one of its dozens of natural hot springs. You’ll also spend a day taking a tour of the island eating more deliciously fresh Caribbean fruit than your stomach should be able to handle.

Play
Video
Seamester Scuba Diving
Exploring the underwater world
20-25 Dives

Students often tell us they chose this voyage because of the amount of diving and dive training we offer. Whether a deep dive on a 100ft. sunken ship in Statia, or a night dive in Guadeloupe, during your 80 days you’ll likely dive 20-25 times.

If you’re new to diving, you’ll earn the PADI Open Water Dive Certification as well as the Advanced Open Water Dive Certification. Depending on time, conditions and student interest, many groups also earn the PADI Rescue Diver certification. If you’re already an experienced diver, you can work all the way up to the professional Divemaster certification. If you feel that scuba diving is a passion, this is definitely the voyage to consider.

Giving Back
20-30 Service Hours

Creating an opportunity to give back to the amazing communities that welcome us is a component of any Sea|mester voyage. While projects vary from voyage to voyage, in the past we’ve done anything from collecting data underwater for local marine parks to building new structures in schools. Our students have also done a little teaching themselves, working in schools to teach local students a little about marine biology and why protecting their environment is critical.

Regardless of the project, making time to give back is a great way to connect on a deeper level to the Caribbean community.

Anchors Down – Guadeloupe & Les Saintes
(4-6 days)

One of the reasons you’ll love the Caribbean is the cultural diversity between each individual island.  Due to colonization in the 1500’s, Guadeloupe & Les Saintes are to this day considered to be a region of France.  The minute you step off the boat you’ll realize that the islands are very much steeped in French culture.  The best examples are found in the Fort Napoleon (yes that Napoleon) in Les Saintes, and the underwater statue of Jacques Cousteau at Pigeon Island in Guadeloupe.

> Next stop: Antigua
Antigua
(5-7 days)

Directly after visiting two very french islands, you’ll arrive at the very British Nelsons Dockyard in Antigua.  This is one of the world’s only fully restored Victorian era dockyards, which provides an amazing backdrop to your time spent in Antigua.  While here, you’ll enjoy a steel drum and reggae concert at Shirley Heights, walk the historic ramparts of English Harbor and dive the crystal blue waters while anchored outside of Green Island.

> Next stop: St. Barths
St. Barths
(2-4 days)

Surf day!  Although you will certainly enjoy a cup of French espresso in Gustavia, the real adventure begins as we pack a couple of jeeps with surf boards and hit the waves for a day of surfing on St. Barths north shore.  Being another of the Lesser Antilles French islands, you’ll pause at lunchtime for a beach picnic of freshly baked baguette and stinky cheese before paddling back out to catch another wave.

> Next stop: Saba & Statia
Saba & Statia
(3-5 days)

These two Dutch islands provide you with yet another culturally diverse backdrop on your adventure through the Caribbean Lesser Antilles.  During your time in Statia you’ll dive the 100ft. shipwreck of the Charlie Brown and snorkel the ruins of Oranjestad’s sunken harbor in search of the elusive blue bead.  At Saba, you’ll test yourself by tackling the 2,855 ft. (1,064 stone steps) tall Mt. Scenery and spend the day learning how to blow glass while visiting the quaint town called The Bottom.

> Next stop: Back to the BVI
Play
Video
accredited-academics-seamester
Academics Aboard
12 USF Credits

Throughout the voyage, it’s easy to forget that this is college even though academics are an integral part of the experience. Our instructors schedule 3 or 4 lectures, discussions, or labs per class each week and each course includes quizzes, research projects, midterms, and finals.

Learning in an environment that combines academia with experience allows you to truly interact with your education. It brings academics to life, adding relevance and practical application to the material. Learning has never been this fun.

Time to Say Goodbye

The best way to explain what it means to say goodbye after such an incredible experience is to use the words from someone who had to do just that…

“It is hard to believe that 80 days have passed by since 15 pale faces climbed aboard Ocean Star for the first time. We have had an amazing adventure over these past 80 days, visiting 13 countries and sailing some 1,320 nautical miles through the Caribbean. We have explored volcanoes, mountains, waterfalls and beaches; learned about new cultures, languages, and food; scuba dived on reefs of all shapes and sizes; learned science, sailing, diving and even how to cook; pushed ourselves academically, physically and emotionally; and turned a boat of 19 strangers into a home and family. This was a great adventure, but don’t let it be your greatest adventure – keep exploring, learning and pushing yourself...”
S/Y Ocean Star Staff TeamBVI, 2015
Day 56
By Eric L.

Tide Pools and Dancing Fools

The Ocean Star crew rose this morning in historic Nelson’s Dockyard to the smell of fresh baked cinnamon rolls by …

Read More
Day 55
By Elizabeth P.

Rays, Rays, Rays!

Sunshine rays, UV rays and the most important rays of all: the southern sting rays! We spent the entire morning …

Read More
Day 52
By Michaela B.

Diving With Jacque Cousteau

Today was an early sleepy awakening on Ocean Star. We moved from the beautiful islands of Les Saintes, over to …

Read More
Day 46
By Abby R.

Kids and Prime Ministers

Today I met a 6-year-old named Malik. I also met a prime minister.   This extremely rainy day for the …

Read More
Day 43
By Marina K.

A Journey to The Center of The Earth

Today’s the day! Its finally time for the long awaited (and my personal favorite) Boiling Lake hike! Dominica is a …

Read More

Trip Logs

Need More Information?

Vocational Certifications

Depending upon previous experience, students will have the opportunity to complete a number of the following certifications during their voyage.

  • Seamester is a PADI 5 Star Resort

    Scuba Certifications

       Open Water Diver
       Advanced Open Water Diver
       Rescue Diver
       Divemaster
       Learn more about scuba
     

  • Seamester is an International Yacht Training partner school

    Sailing Certifications

       International Crew
       VHF Operator
       Navigation Master
       Learn more about sailing

Need To Know

What is the main focus of this voyage?

Our 80-day Sea|mester voyages offer a comprehensive Caribbean experience in terms of the geographical area covered and both academic and vocational classes and certifications earned. During the program, 12 academic credits are offered for the Seamanship, Student Leadership, Oceanography and Marine Biology classes taught aboard. For those with a keen interest in scuba diving, our Caribbean-based voyages offer the greatest opportunity to experience the underwater realm.

What Experience Do I Need?

None at all. All you need is a great attitude and a willingness to fully participate in every aspect of the experience.

Who will be my staff?

Four professional staff members live aboard full-time. There will be the Skipper, the First Mate and a Marine Biologist (who is typically a diving instructor) and a fourth staff member who could also be a scuba instructor, EMT, Marine Scientist or someone with other special skills. Take a look through our team page (About Us) for more information.

What's the weather like?

The short answer to this question is, great! Well, usually anyway! In the Caribbean, the trade winds blow a steady 8-14 knots and the average temperature is 80 Degrees Fahrenheit with 76% humidity and 79 Degrees Fahrenheit water temperature. What’s great about the Caribbean weather is that there is always a breeze, so it feels very comfortable almost all the time. Yes, it does rain now and then, but it is more of a tropical shower, lasting only a few minutes, rather than a complete day of rain.

How do I communicate with home?

When we are ashore or close at anchor there will be plenty of opportunities to communicate with friends and family at home. That said, while aboard we have guidelines as to when it is appropriate to use your personal communications devices. The environment we strive to create relies heavily on each individual remaining focused on the group and our experience. Being tied to the modern world of “instant communications” can, in certain circumstances, be a hindrance to the personal and group processes aboard.

Cell Phones: Check with your provider before you go, but so long as you have a sim card, your cell phone will likely work in most global locations.

Internet: While our vessels are not wifi equipped, another way to communicate is by email, text, Facetime or Skype using shore side internet. The internet is often free or available to purchase in most of the locations that we visit.

What is the food like?

Both on the vessel and ashore, the answer is up to you. The vast majority of the meals during your trip are prepared and eaten aboard. For meals aboard each person on the crew takes a turn as head chef to plan and cook the meals for an entire day with the help of another person acting as sous-chef. We all work to stay within a budget, with both students and staff responsible for stocking the vessels. We endeavor to accommodate everyone aboard while providing what any alumni will tell you, was a great dining adventure. During your free time ashore you will have the opportunity to eat more adventurously. With this voyage being based in the Caribbean, the venturesome amongst the crew will want to seek out some of the traditional West Indian meals such as Chicken Roti or some local Salt Fish.

What's the typical age of the students?

Sea|mester students range in age from 18 through to about 22. Average age is right around 20, yet this can change from voyage to voyage. Give a call through to the office if you are interested in learning more about the student crew.

Nitty Gritty

Flights
As our students fly from all points of the compass, the Sea|mester tuition does not include the cost of travel to and from the program.

This voyage will begin and end in West End, Tortola, British Virgin Islands. Students flying from the US to join us in the BVI may select from one of these two travel options:

  • Fly via St. Thomas (airport code STT): Flights direct to St. Thomas in the US Virgin Islands are typically a less expensive option, and once arrived, students need to make their way to Tortola, which is about 25 miles away by ferry from Charlotte Amalie (10 minutes in a taxi from the St. Thomas airport to the ferry port).
  • Fly to Tortola (airport code EIS) via San Juan, Puerto Rico (airport code SJU): Typically a more expensive route, an alternative way to arrive in the BVI from the US is via San Juan, Puerto Rico. Cape Air, Liat and Seaborne Airlines currently offer scheduled connections from San Juan to Tortola.
Booking Travel

When booking travel, students should be aware that the program start date is the date upon which students should arrive aboard the vessel. The program end date is the date on which students should depart the vessel and start their travel home.

For specific information on travel itineraries and costs, we suggest that you contact our travel coordinator, Leah Hernandez from TRC Travel Center. Leah has helped us organize our global travel for years. She can be reached on 1.800.329.9000 (Texas 281.528.7727) or by email at leahctn68@hotmail.com

Travel Docs & Vaccinations
Skip the stress and plan ahead

Sea|mester cannot apply for passports or visas on a student’s behalf, but we can provide the information you need to do so yourself. All US and Canadian students traveling on this voyage need to have a passport which is valid for a minimum of six months after the date of departure from the Program. Visitors from certain countries other than the US, UK and Canada may require visas. To confirm whether or not a visa is required for any part of this voyage, please call us on +1.941.924.2900

Sea|mester understands that families have varying opinions on vaccinations. Some greatly desire the precaution; others prefer to avoid possible side effects of certain medications. Coupled with the fact that each student has unique medical considerations known best by his or her doctor, Sea|mester does not supply medical advice. We recommend that all families refer to the expertise of the CDC (wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel), their health care providers, and/or a travel clinic. That said, at present there are no special immunizations that are required to visit any of these Caribbean Islands. We do ask that all students check that their Tetanus and Hepatitis B inoculations are up-to-date.

Tuition
Sea|mester tuition covers the following:
  • Sea|mester academic instruction for the applicable courses offered during the voyage
  • University of South Florida (USF) academic credit for all academic classes offered during the program.
  • Full room and board
  • All group excursions, field trips and destination-focused educational experiences
  • Non-professional sailing instruction and certification costs
  • Non-professional scuba instruction and certification costs

Not included in the Sea|mester tuition fees are personal expenses such as the cost of obtaining passports, visas, vaccinations, airport taxes, extra baggage fees, health and travel insurance, medical and evacuation expenses, personal spending money, e-mail, phone calls, souvenirs, etc. As students come from all over the world, air transportation, including in-country flights, are not included.

Insure Your Investment

Although optional, we highly recommend that you purchase insurance to protect your tuition payment against trip cancellation and interruption as well as make provision for emergency medical transportation services.

This coverage is suggested yet optional; about one half of our students purchase it. You are welcome to choose any travel insurance, yet we recommend that you start by looking at the plans provided by Travelex.

Travelex offers a number of standard plans. For this reason, you will need to visit their website so as to determine which plan best fits your needs, then complete the process online using their ‘Get a Quote’ wizard. Click on the link below to start your quote.
Learn More about Travelex

Voyage Itinerary

Though the fundamentals of our voyages do not change, specific logistics evolve over time and can be subject to change based on any number of factors, most of which relate directly to risk management planning.

For this reason, the map and voyage timeline portions of this page should give you a basic understanding of the places we’ll go and activities we’ll do, but you should expect your voyage to be unique. If you take a look through the Trip Logs for previous voyages you’ll see that they can differ significantly.

With that in mind, we encourage all students to “live in the moment” while on the program. Travel, even on organized trips, requires flexibility and a willingness to accept adversity and change. We hope you’ll take the bumps in stride, and enjoy the adventure!

  • Flights
  • Travel Docs & Vaccinations
  • Tuition
  • Voyage Itinerary
  • As our students fly from all points of the compass, the Sea|mester tuition does not include the cost of travel to and from the program.

    This voyage will begin and end in West End, Tortola, British Virgin Islands. Students flying from the US to join us in the BVI may select from one of these two travel options:

    • Fly via St. Thomas (airport code STT): Flights direct to St. Thomas in the US Virgin Islands are typically a less expensive option, and once arrived, students need to make their way to Tortola, which is about 25 miles away by ferry from Charlotte Amalie (10 minutes in a taxi from the St. Thomas airport to the ferry port).
    • Fly to Tortola (airport code EIS) via San Juan, Puerto Rico (airport code SJU): Typically a more expensive route, an alternative way to arrive in the BVI from the US is via San Juan, Puerto Rico. Cape Air, Liat and Seaborne Airlines currently offer scheduled connections from San Juan to Tortola.
    Booking Travel

    When booking travel, students should be aware that the program start date is the date upon which students should arrive aboard the vessel. The program end date is the date on which students should depart the vessel and start their travel home.

    For specific information on travel itineraries and costs, we suggest that you contact our travel coordinator, Leah Hernandez from TRC Travel Center. Leah has helped us organize our global travel for years. She can be reached on 1.800.329.9000 (Texas 281.528.7727) or by email at leahctn68@hotmail.com

  • Skip the stress and plan ahead

    Sea|mester cannot apply for passports or visas on a student’s behalf, but we can provide the information you need to do so yourself. All US and Canadian students traveling on this voyage need to have a passport which is valid for a minimum of six months after the date of departure from the Program. Visitors from certain countries other than the US, UK and Canada may require visas. To confirm whether or not a visa is required for any part of this voyage, please call us on +1.941.924.2900

    Sea|mester understands that families have varying opinions on vaccinations. Some greatly desire the precaution; others prefer to avoid possible side effects of certain medications. Coupled with the fact that each student has unique medical considerations known best by his or her doctor, Sea|mester does not supply medical advice. We recommend that all families refer to the expertise of the CDC (wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel), their health care providers, and/or a travel clinic. That said, at present there are no special immunizations that are required to visit any of these Caribbean Islands. We do ask that all students check that their Tetanus and Hepatitis B inoculations are up-to-date.

  • Sea|mester tuition covers the following:
    • Sea|mester academic instruction for the applicable courses offered during the voyage
    • University of South Florida (USF) academic credit for all academic classes offered during the program.
    • Full room and board
    • All group excursions, field trips and destination-focused educational experiences
    • Non-professional sailing instruction and certification costs
    • Non-professional scuba instruction and certification costs

    Not included in the Sea|mester tuition fees are personal expenses such as the cost of obtaining passports, visas, vaccinations, airport taxes, extra baggage fees, health and travel insurance, medical and evacuation expenses, personal spending money, e-mail, phone calls, souvenirs, etc. As students come from all over the world, air transportation, including in-country flights, are not included.

    Insure Your Investment

    Although optional, we highly recommend that you purchase insurance to protect your tuition payment against trip cancellation and interruption as well as make provision for emergency medical transportation services.

    This coverage is suggested yet optional; about one half of our students purchase it. You are welcome to choose any travel insurance, yet we recommend that you start by looking at the plans provided by Travelex.

    Travelex offers a number of standard plans. For this reason, you will need to visit their website so as to determine which plan best fits your needs, then complete the process online using their ‘Get a Quote’ wizard. Click on the link below to start your quote.
    Learn More about Travelex

  • Though the fundamentals of our voyages do not change, specific logistics evolve over time and can be subject to change based on any number of factors, most of which relate directly to risk management planning.

    For this reason, the map and voyage timeline portions of this page should give you a basic understanding of the places we’ll go and activities we’ll do, but you should expect your voyage to be unique. If you take a look through the Trip Logs for previous voyages you’ll see that they can differ significantly.

    With that in mind, we encourage all students to “live in the moment” while on the program. Travel, even on organized trips, requires flexibility and a willingness to accept adversity and change. We hope you’ll take the bumps in stride, and enjoy the adventure!