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Location: 25 03.03'S 50 56.14'E

Hey, this feels a little one-sided. We keep doing the talking out here on Argo but never receive any response. Cat got your tongue? Have you gone out for coffee? I’ll tell you what’s been happening, but only if you promise to send cookies. Okay? Good. Now let’s see…

Our third full day of passage to South Africa has been one of frustratingly slow progress. We’ve covered just a little over 130 nautical miles in the last 24 hours with the engine on; what little wind there is, has been blowing in our face and that doesn’t help us sail.

The weather system passing south of us is predictable however and we should start making better progress in the next few days. In the meantime, the calmer seas and gently rolling swell does make it fairly easy to practice with the sextant (Elle and Jack are pictured taking a sun sight) and many on board have jumped at the opportunity to learn how to use this traditional seafaring tool to precisely navigate across the ocean using the sun, moon, and stars.

We also had the good fortune to catch a duo of fresh his-and-hers Mahi Mahi today (both Nicks pictured posing with their catches), so we’re looking forward to some great protein supplements tomorrow, as so far, the Indian Ocean Mahi has tasted delicious.

In Oceanography class this afternoon, student presentations included Grace explaining the vital importance of Coral Reef ecosystems to our own survival (pictured), Jules informed the crew as to the problem that the beautiful yet damaging, invasive species of Lionfish brings to the Caribbean, and Hugh educated everybody as to the importance of preserving Mangrove forests, as they prevent coastal erosion as well as serve as home to many young fish species.

Also in class, the IYT Master of Yachts students moved on today to learning about water movement and tidal calculations. Approximately 1000 nm of the open ocean still circulates between our current position and our next landfall, plus at least 1000 more words to be in the trip logs from the Argonauts. Now, about those cookies.