Caribbean Basin

Aboard S/Y Argo

4,500 Nautical Miles via Antigua, Aruba, Jamaica, Cuba, Bahamas, BVI

This is the trip for the adventurer who’s looking for more – a full semester’s worth of credits and 3,000 miles more. Miles you’ll navigate through tides and currents with strangers turned friends; passengers turned crew. Along the way, you’ll explore the Lesser Antilles, The ABC Islands, Jamaica, Cayman the Bahamas and the British Virgin Islands. You’ll scuba dive (day and night) among century-old shipwrecks, writhing reefs and glowing bioluminescence. You’ll hike one of the world’s only two boiling lakes and inside ancient volcanoes–absorbing the history, geography and culture of the islands along the way. Sailing full circle, you’ll compete in the world-famous Antigua Classic Yacht Regatta at the adventure’s climax.

  • Days
  • Credits
  • Students
  • Term
  • Availability
  • Tuition (USD)
Spring / Jan 15 - Apr 14, 2019
  • 90
  • 12 credits
  • 24
  • Spring
  • Open
  • $26,370

Life Aboard

Sails Up Anchors Down

Academic Classes

Certification Courses

Activities

  • Scuba Diving & Snorkeling
  • Educational & Cultural Tours
  • Hiking & Trekking
  • Service
  • Personal Time

The Voyage

Your Adventure Starts Here
Welcome aboard!

The journey begins at the historic Nelsons Dockyard in English Harbor, Antigua. It won’t be hard to find our 112-ft schooner, S/Y Argo, tied alongside the dock with an eager crew of 6 staff waiting to help you with your luggage. After dropping your bags in your cabin, it’s time to take a breath, look around and realize that this beautiful schooner floating atop crystal clear Caribbean waters is now your home and classroom for the next 90 days as you embark on the voyage of a lifetime.

Learning the Ropes
8-10 days

After spending a couple days exploring the rich history of Admiral Nelson’s dockyard, we cast off our lines and the journey truly begins. As with all Sea|mester voyages, the first week to ten days of the program is a crash course on how to be successful in your new environment. With the guidance of our staff, you’ll learn the in’s and out’s of how to live, work and learn in such close quarters with others – from sailing to cooking and everything in between.

Those new to scuba diving will spend quite a bit of time underwater working towards the PADI Open Water Certification. Those arriving with more experience will get reacquainted with the underwater world by taking a few refresher dives.

During the first week, you’ll also have your first lectures for each of the four college-level courses. While the structure of the syllabi might look familiar, you’ll quickly find that learning from the deck of a boat couldn’t be more different.

Sample Trip Itinerary*
Area Ports of Call
Lesser Antilles Antigua, Les Saints, Dominica, Martinique Grenada, BVI
Netherlands Antilles Aruba, Bonaire
Greater Antilles Jamaica, Grand Cayman
Honduras Roatan
Cuba* Cienfuegos, Havana
Bahamas New Providence, Eleuthera
*Dependent on U.S. State Department permitting. Please note that all destinations are weather dependent and subject to change.

 

Play
Video
Rite of Passage
Island Hopping and Passage Making

It’s amazing to realize that a 112 ft. schooner is your new home, classroom and mode of transportation, however once this starts to settle in and become your new normal, you truly begin to fine tune your skills in sailing on this voyage throughout the Caribbean Basin. From here on out, the distances between ports will range from half day adventures to 3-5 day nonstop passages. Regardless of the length, each passage will bring the crew closer together as you share the responsibility of piloting S/Y Argo over the open sea. Make no mistake, as a Sea|mester student you are not a passenger, you are the crew responsible for making the ship sail. You’ll be an integral part of a watch team sharing the responsibility of navigation, bow watch, engine checks, sail trim and steering the ship to its intended destination.

Les Saintes
(8-10 days)

One of the reasons you’ll love the Caribbean is the cultural diversity between each individual island.  Due to colonialization in the 1500’s, Guadeloupe & Les Saintes are to this day considered to be a region of France.  The minute you step off the boat you’ll realize that the islands  are very much steeped in French culture.  The best examples are found in Fort Napoleon (yes that Napoleon) in Les Saintes.

> Next stop: Dominica
Dominica
(3-5 Days)

Although you can see Dominica from Les Saintes, the cultures of these neighbors might as well come from different sides of the planet. Nicknamed the Nature Isle of the Caribbean, Dominica is often considered one of our students’ favorite islands of the voyage.  With the help of our good friends, local Dominicans Pancho and Sea Cat, you’ll hike through the rainforest to the world’s largest boiling lake, all while refreshing yourself in one of its dozens of natural hot springs.

>Next stop: Grenada
Grenada & The Grenadines
(5-7 days)

From Dominica you’ll embark on your longest passage yet, 3 days of beautiful downwind sailing to the islands of St Vincent and the Grenadines. During your time in the Grenadines you’ll get the chance to tour the unique whaling culture of Bequia or swim with turtles in the bluest water you’ve ever seen in the Tobago Cays or maybe a hike to the top of the epic Seven Sisters Waterfalls in Grenada sounds good to you?

> Next stop: Bonaire & Aruba
Bonaire and Aruba
(2-4 Days)

The ABC islands might be just off the coast of Venezuela but life on shore is closer to life in the Netherlands. Windsurfers from all over the world flock to the windward side of Bonaire where the conditions are ideal for experts and beginners alike! The island also offers some of the best deep diving, wildlife, and pristine reefs – and it’s all accessible directly from the beach! Aruba is a short hop away and a necessary stop off point for Argo and crew to not only restock the ships provisions but also spend some time relaxing on the Marina’s private island with a local population of flamingos

>Next stop: Jamaica
Play
Video
scuba-semester-abroad
Underwater Breathing!
20-25 Dives

Wether in Dominica or the Bahamas, students onboard Argo during the Caribbean Basin voyage will experience some of the world’s best scuba diving. Over the course of the 90-day voyage, you’ll become an experienced diver, completing between 20 and 25 dives. However, the novelty of breathing underwater won’t disappear.

Whether working towards a new certification in 15 feet of water, researching on a barrier reef, or just exploring a wreck at 100 ft. – you’ll gain a lifetime worth of stories from places few people get to see.

If you’re new to diving, you’ll earn the PADI Open Water Dive Certification as well as the Advanced Open Water Dive Certification. Depending on time, conditions and student interest, many groups also earn the PADI Rescue Diver certification. If you’re already an experienced diver, you can work all the way up to the professional Divemaster certification. If you feel that scuba diving is a passion, this is definitely the voyage to consider.

Giving Back
20-30 Service Hours

Creating an opportunity to give back to the amazing communities that welcome us is a component of any Sea|mester voyage. While projects vary from voyage to voyage, in the past we’ve done anything from collecting data underwater for local marine parks to building new structures in schools. Our students have also done a little teaching themselves, working in schools to teach local students a little about marine biology and why protecting their environment is critical.

Regardless of the project, making time to give back is a great way to connect on a deeper level to the Caribbean community.

  • Get Our Free Online Brochure

    Full of detailed information about our voyages, staff, and FAQs for you to access anytime
Anchors Down – Jamaica
(4-6 days)

Sail into Port Antonio, known as the gateway to the most idyllic tropical jungles and waterfalls Jamaica has to offer, and throw your lines to the handlers at the quaint Errol Flynn Marina in time to sample some locally spiced Jerk Chicken. Spend time with the Argo crew exploring the famous Blue Lagoon and taking surfing lessons in Boston Bay.

> Next stop: Roatan, Honduras
Anchors Down – Roatan, Honduras or Cayman Islands
(4-6 days)

Depending on time and weather your next destination will either be the Cayman Islands or Roatan, part of the Honduran Bay Island chain. Whether its one or the other, both are known for their incredible diving. Explore 7 mile beach on Grand Cayman or grab an adrenalin rush from one of the worlds longest Zip Lines, beginning at the mountain top and traversing right down to the beach under the canopy of lush Roatan Rain Forrest. Both ports of call provide great opportunities to continue your underwater training.

> Next stop: Cuba
Anchors Down – Cuba
(4-6 days)

A favourite vacation destination for Sinatra and the rest of the Rat Pack. Your time in Cuba will begin by sailing through the cut into the town of Cienfuegos on the South Coast where you will collect scientific data in Guanaroca Lagoon as part of a Cuban national species identification study. Next stop is Isle de Juventude as Argo sails through the Canarreos Archipelago enroute to the capital, Havana. Once in Havana, docked at the Hemmingway Marina, you will have the chance to explore the old city and marvel at the mix of Spanish colonial history, vehicles from a time past and the vibrant personalities of the city’s local population. Cuban Marine Scientists from the Islands Universities will also be on hand to talk about the conservation and marine management programs currently being exercised.

> Next stop: Bahamas
Anchors Down – Bahamas
(4-6 days)

Nassau, located on New Providence, is Argo’s first port of call in the Caribbean Archipelago of the Bahamas. Comprising of over 700 islands The Bahamas is where Colombus made first landfall in 1492, consequently discovering “the new world”. Up next is San Salvador, an exceptional location for those aspiring PADI Rescue Divers to finish up all their training and celebrate with a BBQ on one of the pristine white sandy beaches.

> Next stop: Back to Antigua
Time to Say Goodbye

The best way to explain what it means to say goodbye after such an incredible experience is to use the words from someone who had to do just that…

“90 days. 4,390 nautical miles. 22 people. 18 dives. 37 shopping carts. 628 biscuits. 11 countries. 4 wins at Race Week. However you break down the numbers, this has been an incredible semester — one which we as staff have enjoyed immensely. Not everything about this trip can be broken down into numbers, though, and as our students leave us and make their ways back home to friends and family, we know that they’ll come to understand this in the coming days. We wouldn’t do this work if we didn’t believe that what we do is special, and trust me when I say that Sea|mester has magic in it. You feel it when you’re up on night watch, looking up at the stars flung across the sky and the bioluminescence lighting up dark waters below. You feel it when you come back to the boat from a day ashore bubbling with joy and enthusiasm, having just experienced something so incredible and unique you struggle to put it into words. You feel it when your team drops the headsails in less than a minute, when you feed 20 people an awesome meal for the first time, when you bare your deepest secrets on bow watch and the person sitting next to you just smiles, hugs you, understands. ”
Day 90
By Tina. D

Day 90: All Good Things Come To An End…

90 days. 4,390 nautical miles. 22 people. 18 dives. 37 shopping carts. 628 biscuits. 11 countries. 4 wins at Race …

Read More
Day 85
By Orren. F

Day 85: The Final Days

As the end of our semester approaches, all of Argo’s inhabitants donned clean, cozy Argo sweatshirts while waiting for the …

Read More
Day 84
By Benjamin. G

Day 84: Winner’s Vacation

We woke up after a fantastic night out and award ceremony to a tasty fruit breakfast. This was our last …

Read More
Day 83
By Katelyn. D

Day 83: Sweeping the Antigua Classics Week Regatta

Today was our fourth and final race; the Windward race. It all started as another morning waking up at 7am …

Read More
Day 80
By Emily. H

Day 80: Off To An Awesome Start!

This morning we woke up bright and early for our first day of racing. We prepared Argo and ate delicious …

Read More
Day 78
By Oscar. vdG

Day 78: Getting Ready To Race

Today started bright and early after yesterday’s easy evening. After an awesome cinnamon roll breakfast we launched into cleanup and …

Read More
Day 75
By Keenan. R

Day 75: The Baths

It was a slow start on Argo this morning, everyone is beginning to show the wear of long days of …

Read More
Day 73
By Isaac. L

Day 73: Diving The RMS Rhone

A hasty wake-up call this morning was partially prompted by the heady aroma of chocolate chip pancakes and an urgency …

Read More
Day 71
By Simona. S

Day 71: Land Ho!

After a long six day passage from San Salvador we were able to call “Land Ho” this morning as we …

Read More
Day 64
By Zachary. H

Day 64: A Beautiful Day In The Bahamas

What a day! The Bahamas are obviously gorgeous so what better way to spend our day than to go diving …

Read More

Trip Logs

Welcome aboard!

The journey begins at the historic Nelsons Dockyard in English Harbor, Antigua. It won’t be hard to find our 112-ft schooner, S/Y Argo, tied alongside the dock with an eager crew of 6 staff waiting to help you with your luggage. After dropping your bags in your cabin, it’s time to take a breath, look around and realize that this beautiful schooner floating atop crystal clear Caribbean waters is now your home and classroom for the next 90 days as you embark on the voyage of a lifetime.

Sample Trip Itinerary*
Area Ports of Call
Lesser Antilles Antigua, Les Saints, Dominica, Martinique Grenada, BVI
Netherlands Antilles Aruba, Bonaire
Greater Antilles Jamaica, Grand Cayman
Honduras Roatan
Cuba* Cienfuegos, Havana
Bahamas New Providence, Eleuthera
*Dependent on U.S. State Department permitting. Please note that all destinations are weather dependent and subject to change.

 

Learning the Ropes
8-10 days

After spending a couple days exploring the rich history of Admiral Nelson’s dockyard, we cast off our lines and the journey truly begins. As with all Sea|mester voyages, the first week to ten days of the program is a crash course on how to be successful in your new environment. With the guidance of our staff, you’ll learn the in’s and out’s of how to live, work and learn in such close quarters with others – from sailing to cooking and everything in between.

Those new to scuba diving will spend quite a bit of time underwater working towards the PADI Open Water Certification. Those arriving with more experience will get reacquainted with the underwater world by taking a few refresher dives.

During the first week, you’ll also have your first lectures for each of the four college-level courses. While the structure of the syllabi might look familiar, you’ll quickly find that learning from the deck of a boat couldn’t be more different.

Play
Video
Rite of Passage
Island Hopping and Passage Making

It’s amazing to realize that a 112 ft. schooner is your new home, classroom and mode of transportation, however once this starts to settle in and become your new normal, you truly begin to fine tune your skills in sailing on this voyage throughout the Caribbean Basin. From here on out, the distances between ports will range from half day adventures to 3-5 day nonstop passages. Regardless of the length, each passage will bring the crew closer together as you share the responsibility of piloting S/Y Argo over the open sea. Make no mistake, as a Sea|mester student you are not a passenger, you are the crew responsible for making the ship sail. You’ll be an integral part of a watch team sharing the responsibility of navigation, bow watch, engine checks, sail trim and steering the ship to its intended destination.

Les Saintes
(8-10 days)

One of the reasons you’ll love the Caribbean is the cultural diversity between each individual island.  Due to colonialization in the 1500’s, Guadeloupe & Les Saintes are to this day considered to be a region of France.  The minute you step off the boat you’ll realize that the islands  are very much steeped in French culture.  The best examples are found in Fort Napoleon (yes that Napoleon) in Les Saintes.

> Next stop: Dominica
Dominica
(3-5 Days)

Although you can see Dominica from Les Saintes, the cultures of these neighbors might as well come from different sides of the planet. Nicknamed the Nature Isle of the Caribbean, Dominica is often considered one of our students’ favorite islands of the voyage.  With the help of our good friends, local Dominicans Pancho and Sea Cat, you’ll hike through the rainforest to the world’s largest boiling lake, all while refreshing yourself in one of its dozens of natural hot springs.

>Next stop: Grenada
Grenada & The Grenadines
(5-7 days)

From Dominica you’ll embark on your longest passage yet, 3 days of beautiful downwind sailing to the islands of St Vincent and the Grenadines. During your time in the Grenadines you’ll get the chance to tour the unique whaling culture of Bequia or swim with turtles in the bluest water you’ve ever seen in the Tobago Cays or maybe a hike to the top of the epic Seven Sisters Waterfalls in Grenada sounds good to you?

> Next stop: Bonaire & Aruba
Bonaire and Aruba
(2-4 Days)

The ABC islands might be just off the coast of Venezuela but life on shore is closer to life in the Netherlands. Windsurfers from all over the world flock to the windward side of Bonaire where the conditions are ideal for experts and beginners alike! The island also offers some of the best deep diving, wildlife, and pristine reefs – and it’s all accessible directly from the beach! Aruba is a short hop away and a necessary stop off point for Argo and crew to not only restock the ships provisions but also spend some time relaxing on the Marina’s private island with a local population of flamingos

>Next stop: Jamaica
Play
Video
scuba-semester-abroad
Underwater Breathing!
20-25 Dives

Wether in Dominica or the Bahamas, students onboard Argo during the Caribbean Basin voyage will experience some of the world’s best scuba diving. Over the course of the 90-day voyage, you’ll become an experienced diver, completing between 20 and 25 dives. However, the novelty of breathing underwater won’t disappear.

Whether working towards a new certification in 15 feet of water, researching on a barrier reef, or just exploring a wreck at 100 ft. – you’ll gain a lifetime worth of stories from places few people get to see.

If you’re new to diving, you’ll earn the PADI Open Water Dive Certification as well as the Advanced Open Water Dive Certification. Depending on time, conditions and student interest, many groups also earn the PADI Rescue Diver certification. If you’re already an experienced diver, you can work all the way up to the professional Divemaster certification. If you feel that scuba diving is a passion, this is definitely the voyage to consider.

  • Get Our Free Online Brochure

    Full of detailed information about our voyages, staff, and FAQs for you to access anytime

Giving Back
20-30 Service Hours

Creating an opportunity to give back to the amazing communities that welcome us is a component of any Sea|mester voyage. While projects vary from voyage to voyage, in the past we’ve done anything from collecting data underwater for local marine parks to building new structures in schools. Our students have also done a little teaching themselves, working in schools to teach local students a little about marine biology and why protecting their environment is critical.

Regardless of the project, making time to give back is a great way to connect on a deeper level to the Caribbean community.

Anchors Down – Jamaica
(4-6 days)

Sail into Port Antonio, known as the gateway to the most idyllic tropical jungles and waterfalls Jamaica has to offer, and throw your lines to the handlers at the quaint Errol Flynn Marina in time to sample some locally spiced Jerk Chicken. Spend time with the Argo crew exploring the famous Blue Lagoon and taking surfing lessons in Boston Bay.

> Next stop: Roatan, Honduras
Anchors Down – Roatan, Honduras or Cayman Islands
(4-6 days)

Depending on time and weather your next destination will either be the Cayman Islands or Roatan, part of the Honduran Bay Island chain. Whether its one or the other, both are known for their incredible diving. Explore 7 mile beach on Grand Cayman or grab an adrenalin rush from one of the worlds longest Zip Lines, beginning at the mountain top and traversing right down to the beach under the canopy of lush Roatan Rain Forrest. Both ports of call provide great opportunities to continue your underwater training.

> Next stop: Cuba
Anchors Down – Cuba
(4-6 days)

A favourite vacation destination for Sinatra and the rest of the Rat Pack. Your time in Cuba will begin by sailing through the cut into the town of Cienfuegos on the South Coast where you will collect scientific data in Guanaroca Lagoon as part of a Cuban national species identification study. Next stop is Isle de Juventude as Argo sails through the Canarreos Archipelago enroute to the capital, Havana. Once in Havana, docked at the Hemmingway Marina, you will have the chance to explore the old city and marvel at the mix of Spanish colonial history, vehicles from a time past and the vibrant personalities of the city’s local population. Cuban Marine Scientists from the Islands Universities will also be on hand to talk about the conservation and marine management programs currently being exercised.

> Next stop: Bahamas
Anchors Down – Bahamas
(4-6 days)

Nassau, located on New Providence, is Argo’s first port of call in the Caribbean Archipelago of the Bahamas. Comprising of over 700 islands The Bahamas is where Colombus made first landfall in 1492, consequently discovering “the new world”. Up next is San Salvador, an exceptional location for those aspiring PADI Rescue Divers to finish up all their training and celebrate with a BBQ on one of the pristine white sandy beaches.

> Next stop: Back to Antigua
Time to Say Goodbye

The best way to explain what it means to say goodbye after such an incredible experience is to use the words from someone who had to do just that…

“90 days. 4,390 nautical miles. 22 people. 18 dives. 37 shopping carts. 628 biscuits. 11 countries. 4 wins at Race Week. However you break down the numbers, this has been an incredible semester — one which we as staff have enjoyed immensely. Not everything about this trip can be broken down into numbers, though, and as our students leave us and make their ways back home to friends and family, we know that they’ll come to understand this in the coming days. We wouldn’t do this work if we didn’t believe that what we do is special, and trust me when I say that Sea|mester has magic in it. You feel it when you’re up on night watch, looking up at the stars flung across the sky and the bioluminescence lighting up dark waters below. You feel it when you come back to the boat from a day ashore bubbling with joy and enthusiasm, having just experienced something so incredible and unique you struggle to put it into words. You feel it when your team drops the headsails in less than a minute, when you feed 20 people an awesome meal for the first time, when you bare your deepest secrets on bow watch and the person sitting next to you just smiles, hugs you, understands. ”
Day 90
By Tina. D

Day 90: All Good Things Come To An End…

90 days. 4,390 nautical miles. 22 people. 18 dives. 37 shopping carts. 628 biscuits. 11 countries. 4 wins at Race …

Read More
Day 85
By Orren. F

Day 85: The Final Days

As the end of our semester approaches, all of Argo’s inhabitants donned clean, cozy Argo sweatshirts while waiting for the …

Read More
Day 84
By Benjamin. G

Day 84: Winner’s Vacation

We woke up after a fantastic night out and award ceremony to a tasty fruit breakfast. This was our last …

Read More
Day 83
By Katelyn. D

Day 83: Sweeping the Antigua Classics Week Regatta

Today was our fourth and final race; the Windward race. It all started as another morning waking up at 7am …

Read More
Day 80
By Emily. H

Day 80: Off To An Awesome Start!

This morning we woke up bright and early for our first day of racing. We prepared Argo and ate delicious …

Read More
Day 78
By Oscar. vdG

Day 78: Getting Ready To Race

Today started bright and early after yesterday’s easy evening. After an awesome cinnamon roll breakfast we launched into cleanup and …

Read More
Day 75
By Keenan. R

Day 75: The Baths

It was a slow start on Argo this morning, everyone is beginning to show the wear of long days of …

Read More
Day 73
By Isaac. L

Day 73: Diving The RMS Rhone

A hasty wake-up call this morning was partially prompted by the heady aroma of chocolate chip pancakes and an urgency …

Read More
Day 71
By Simona. S

Day 71: Land Ho!

After a long six day passage from San Salvador we were able to call “Land Ho” this morning as we …

Read More
Day 64
By Zachary. H

Day 64: A Beautiful Day In The Bahamas

What a day! The Bahamas are obviously gorgeous so what better way to spend our day than to go diving …

Read More

Trip Logs

Need More Information?

Vocational Certifications

Depending upon previous experience, students will have the opportunity to complete a number of the following certifications during their voyage.

  • Seamester is a PADI 5 Star Resort

    Scuba Certifications

       Open Water Diver
       Advanced Open Water Diver
       Rescue Diver
       Divemaster
       Learn more about scuba
     

  • Seamester is an International Yacht Training partner school

    Sailing Certifications

       International Crew
       VHF Operator
       Navigation Master
       Master of Yachts 200 Ton Offshore Theory
       Learn more about sailing

Need To Know

What is the main focus of this voyage?

Our 90-day Global Sea|mester Voyages offer the most comprehensive experience in terms of the geographical area covered and both academic and vocational classes and certifications earned. During the program, up to 12 academic credits are offered for the Seamanship, Student Leadership, Oceanography, and Marine Biology classes taught aboard. In addition, there are several vocational courses offered for those looking to further their professional development in the maritime industry. For more information on our classes, please visit our academics page.

What Experience Do I Need?

None at all. All you need is a great attitude and a willingness to fully participate in every aspect of the experience.

Who will be my staff?

Six professional staff members live aboard full-time. There will be the Skipper, the First and Second Mate and two Marine Biologists (who are typically scuba diving instructors) and a sixth staff member who could also be an EMT or someone with other special skills. Take a look through our team page for more information.

What's the weather like?

The short answer to this question is, great! Well, usually anyway! In the Caribbean, the trade winds blow a steady 8-14 knots and the average temperature is 80 Degrees Fahrenheit with 76% humidity and 79 Degrees Fahrenheit water temperature. What’s great about the Caribbean weather is that there is always a breeze, so it feels very comfortable almost all the time. Yes, it does rain now and then, but it is more of a tropical shower, lasting only a few minutes, rather than a complete day of rain.

How do I communicate with home?

When we are ashore or close at anchor there will be plenty of opportunities to communicate with friends and family at home. That said, while aboard we have guidelines as to when it is appropriate to use your personal communications devices. The environment we strive to create relies heavily on each individual remaining focused on the group and our experience. Being tied to the modern world of “instant communications” can, in certain circumstances, be a hindrance to the personal and group processes aboard.

Cell Phones: Check with your provider before you go, but so long as you have a sim card, your cell phone will likely work in most global locations.

Internet: While our vessels are not wifi equipped, another way to communicate is by email, text, Facetime or Skype using shore side internet. The internet is often free or available to purchase in most of the locations that we visit.

What is the food like?

Both on the vessel and ashore, the answer is up to you. The vast majority of the meals during your trip are prepared and eaten aboard. For meals aboard each person on the crew takes a turn as head chef to plan and cook the meals for an entire day with the help of another person acting as sous-chef. We all work to stay within a budget, with both students and staff responsible for stocking the vessels. We endeavor to accommodate everyone aboard while providing what any alumni will tell you, was a great dining adventure.

Nitty Gritty

Flights
As our students fly from all points of the compass, the Sea|mester tuition does not include the cost of travel to and from the program.

This voyage will both begin and end in Antigua (airport code ANU) yet even though we are starting and ending in the same location this program will take you a diverse range of island nations.

Booking Travel

When booking travel, students should be aware that the program start date is the date upon which students should arrive aboard the vessel. The program end date is the date on which students should depart the vessel and start their travel home.

For specific information on travel itineraries and costs, we suggest that you contact our travel coordinator, Leah Hernandez from TRC Travel Center. Leah has helped us organize our global travel for years. She can be reached on 1.800.329.9000 (Texas 281.528.7727) or by email at leahctn68@hotmail.com

Travel Docs & Vaccinations
Skip the stress and plan ahead

Sea|mester cannot apply for passports or visas on a student’s behalf, but we can provide the information you need to do so yourself. All US and Canadian students traveling on this voyage need to have a passport which is valid for a minimum of six months after the date of departure from the Program. Visitors from certain countries other than the US, UK and Canada may require visas. To confirm whether or not a visa is required for any part of this voyage, please call us on +1.941.924.2900

Sea|mester understands that families have varying opinions on vaccinations. Some greatly desire the precaution; others prefer to avoid possible side effects of certain medications. Coupled with the fact that each student has unique medical considerations known best by his or her doctor, Sea|mester does not supply medical advice. We recommend that all families refer to the expertise of the CDC (wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel), their health care providers, and/or a travel clinic. We do ask that all students check that their Tetanus and Hepatitis B inoculations are up-to-date.

Tuition
Sea|mester tuition covers the following:
  • Sea|mester academic instruction for the applicable courses offered during the voyage
  • University of South Florida (USF) academic credit for all academic classes offered during the program.
  • Full room and board
  • All group excursions, field trips and destination-focused educational experiences
  • Non-professional sailing instruction and certification costs
  • Non-professional scuba instruction and certification costs

Not included in the Sea|mester tuition fees are personal expenses such as the cost of obtaining passports, visas, vaccinations, airport taxes, extra baggage fees, health and travel insurance, medical and evacuation expenses, personal spending money, e-mail, phone calls, souvenirs, etc. As students come from all over the world, air transportation, including in-country flights, are not included.

Insure Your Investment

Although optional, we highly recommend that you purchase insurance to protect your tuition payment against trip cancellation and interruption as well as make provision for emergency medical transportation services.

This coverage is suggested yet optional; about one half of our students purchase it. You are welcome to choose any travel insurance, yet we recommend that you start by looking at the plans provided by Travelex.

Travelex offers a number of standard plans. For this reason, you will need to visit their website so as to determine which plan best fits your needs, then complete the process online using their ‘Get a Quote’ wizard. Click on the link below to start your quote.
Learn More about Travelex

Voyage Itinerary

Though the fundamentals of our voyages do not change, specific logistics evolve over time and can be subject to change based on any number of factors, most of which relate directly to risk management planning.

For this reason, the map and voyage timeline portions of this page should give you a basic understanding of the places we’ll go and activities we’ll do, but you should expect your voyage to be unique. If you take a look through the Trip Logs for previous voyages you’ll see that they can differ significantly.

With that in mind, we encourage all students to “live in the moment” while on the program. Travel, even on organized trips, requires flexibility and a willingness to accept adversity and change. We hope you’ll take the bumps in stride, and enjoy the adventure!

  • Flights
  • Travel Docs & Vaccinations
  • Tuition
  • Voyage Itinerary
  • As our students fly from all points of the compass, the Sea|mester tuition does not include the cost of travel to and from the program.

    This voyage will both begin and end in Antigua (airport code ANU) yet even though we are starting and ending in the same location this program will take you a diverse range of island nations.

    Booking Travel

    When booking travel, students should be aware that the program start date is the date upon which students should arrive aboard the vessel. The program end date is the date on which students should depart the vessel and start their travel home.

    For specific information on travel itineraries and costs, we suggest that you contact our travel coordinator, Leah Hernandez from TRC Travel Center. Leah has helped us organize our global travel for years. She can be reached on 1.800.329.9000 (Texas 281.528.7727) or by email at leahctn68@hotmail.com

  • Skip the stress and plan ahead

    Sea|mester cannot apply for passports or visas on a student’s behalf, but we can provide the information you need to do so yourself. All US and Canadian students traveling on this voyage need to have a passport which is valid for a minimum of six months after the date of departure from the Program. Visitors from certain countries other than the US, UK and Canada may require visas. To confirm whether or not a visa is required for any part of this voyage, please call us on +1.941.924.2900

    Sea|mester understands that families have varying opinions on vaccinations. Some greatly desire the precaution; others prefer to avoid possible side effects of certain medications. Coupled with the fact that each student has unique medical considerations known best by his or her doctor, Sea|mester does not supply medical advice. We recommend that all families refer to the expertise of the CDC (wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel), their health care providers, and/or a travel clinic. We do ask that all students check that their Tetanus and Hepatitis B inoculations are up-to-date.

  • Sea|mester tuition covers the following:
    • Sea|mester academic instruction for the applicable courses offered during the voyage
    • University of South Florida (USF) academic credit for all academic classes offered during the program.
    • Full room and board
    • All group excursions, field trips and destination-focused educational experiences
    • Non-professional sailing instruction and certification costs
    • Non-professional scuba instruction and certification costs

    Not included in the Sea|mester tuition fees are personal expenses such as the cost of obtaining passports, visas, vaccinations, airport taxes, extra baggage fees, health and travel insurance, medical and evacuation expenses, personal spending money, e-mail, phone calls, souvenirs, etc. As students come from all over the world, air transportation, including in-country flights, are not included.

    Insure Your Investment

    Although optional, we highly recommend that you purchase insurance to protect your tuition payment against trip cancellation and interruption as well as make provision for emergency medical transportation services.

    This coverage is suggested yet optional; about one half of our students purchase it. You are welcome to choose any travel insurance, yet we recommend that you start by looking at the plans provided by Travelex.

    Travelex offers a number of standard plans. For this reason, you will need to visit their website so as to determine which plan best fits your needs, then complete the process online using their ‘Get a Quote’ wizard. Click on the link below to start your quote.
    Learn More about Travelex

  • Though the fundamentals of our voyages do not change, specific logistics evolve over time and can be subject to change based on any number of factors, most of which relate directly to risk management planning.

    For this reason, the map and voyage timeline portions of this page should give you a basic understanding of the places we’ll go and activities we’ll do, but you should expect your voyage to be unique. If you take a look through the Trip Logs for previous voyages you’ll see that they can differ significantly.

    With that in mind, we encourage all students to “live in the moment” while on the program. Travel, even on organized trips, requires flexibility and a willingness to accept adversity and change. We hope you’ll take the bumps in stride, and enjoy the adventure!