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Location: 13 13.90'N 62 59.52'W

I started my day with a 12-4 a.m. watch on the second day of our four day passage to Bonaire. After a cup of instant coffee and a little sugar, my watch could officially begin. Once my watch was over, I headed back to bed and woke up at around 9:45 this morning and realized that I was the skipper of the day. I was excited to finally be able to lead our crew through the day and have some new responsibilities around Argo. The only thing is, I didn’t think I would have anything interesting to write in the blog for this evening. However, I realized today that there is ALWAYS something exciting happening on Argo. I had my second shift of the day from 12-2 p.m. during which a few of us got a couple shades redder in the shape of our PFDs. We had Oceanography class after lunch where we learned about different types of sediment, where to find it and how it was made. After Oceanography we had leadership class where we discussed different types of leadership through some cordial debates.

 

Thus far, we have been unlucky with catching fish. However, that doesn’t stop us from casting our lines every morning, and reeling them in every night. Except today, after motoring through a patch of Sargassum, we finally caught our first fish, a 35 pound 4’4″ long Wahoo. For my marine biology group project we are analyzing fish stomach contents with relation to upwellings and distance from land, so after 18 days we finally have some data for our study. After the excitement of catching our fish had settled, we sat down for dinner on deck, only to be accompanied by a pod of dolphins surfing Argo’s wake. It is currently 7:27 p.m. my next watch starts in 30 minutes for the 8-12 a.m. watch. I’m excited to see what tomorrow has in store for us, and I’m even more excited to be that much closer to Bonaire.

 

Picture 1 – Ian, our sailing instructor/fishing overseer/semi-professional deep-sea fisherman holding today’s catch

Picture 2 – Getting our lines ready at around 10 a.m.

Picture 3 – Taking notes in oceanography class